$10,285.00

Raised of $10,000 goal.


103%

Funded

117

Supporters

0

Days Left
This campaign ended on Wednesday, Jul. 1, 2015



Who Are We?

We are the University of Washington (UW) Concrete Canoe team.  Every year, we work to design, build, and compete with a new canoe made out of concrete.  Yes, that’s right, our concrete floats!  Moreover, our concrete actually has to be lighter than water to meet competition requirements.  This poses an incredible design challenge that inspires us as engineering students to apply our studies to come up with some very creative solutions.  Also, as one of the few clubs sponsored by the UW Department of Civil Engineering, the Concrete Canoe team performs a very important social function by both introducing interested students to the department and forming a community of peers within the department.

Each year, teams from around the country (and some abroad) design and build their own concrete canoes to participate in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) National Concrete Canoe Competition.  This competition is implemented at both the regional and national levels.  For a third year in a row, the UW Concrete Canoe team placed first at the regional competition, earning us an invitation to compete at the national level.  Many generous companies provided us with the funds, materials, and services we needed to participate at the regional competition. We truly appreciate all the support we have received so far. A list of our sponsors can be found at the bottom of this page. Unfortunately, traveling to the June 19th-22nd national competition at Clemson University in South Carolina incurs additional costs that will lead us to exceed our yearly budget.
We made the canoe float, now we need your help to get it to the national competition!


Making of the Canoe

A lot of hard work goes into making a concrete canoe.  Some of the primary design tasks include:
  • Designing the hull
  • Optimizing and testing concrete mixtures
  • Performing structural and hydraulic analysis
  • Drafting construction and reinforcing plans
  • Creating and implementing a theme
  • Designing and creating display materials, a cross section, and a canoe stand
After we have finished the design of the canoe, we enter the construction phase.  This phase is centered on one of the most important events of the year: placing day.  This is the day when we actually place the concrete hull.  We hand place our concrete in three targeted layers, using two stronger structural mix layers to sandwich a lightweight middle mix.  In between each layer, we lay down fiberglass and carbon fiber reinforcing meshes.  Placing day is an incredible learning experience because it provides students with an opportunity to work with concrete and troubleshoot construction issues that arise. Following placing day, the team spends roughly two months patching, sanding, and staining the canoe.




The Legend of the Orca

This year’s canoe, Ska’ana, is named after the word for ‘Orca’ in the native language of the Haida people of the Pacific Northwest.  Our theme this year follows the origin story of these majestic creatures.  According to the legend, a man raises two wolf pups he finds along the sea shore to swim and hunt sea creatures.  Every day, the wolves would go out and hunt, accumulating far too much food.  This wastefulness was observed by the higher powers, who then punished the wolves by enveloping them in a fog while they were hunting at sea.  The wolves, unable to return to shore, instead transformed into the Orca whales of today.  The story's message about sustainability appealed to our team.  This year’s concrete reused many of the materials left over from last year and featured higher amounts of slag, a recycled iron product, which reduced our environmental impact.


Competition Overview

Both the regional and national competitions are broken up and scored in four distinct categories:
  • A design paper that fully describes the design, construction methods, and all other work associated with the project
  • A five minute presentation covering all aspects of the project followed by seven minutes of questions from a panel of engineers 
  • An overall score for the quality of the final product
  • Five races, including men's and women's sprints, men's and women's endurance, and co-ed sprints.
Our team began preparing for each of the four components in the fall. For example, the paddlers have been practicing at least weekly since September. The competition goes far beyond simply building a quality concrete canoe. Failing to succeed in any of these categories will dramatically reduce a team’s score.




Cost Breakdown

The expenses required to attend the national competition are significant. Fortunately, the ASCE Seattle chapter, the National ASCE chapter, and engineering firms have promised to contribute additional funds to help offset some of these costs. The primary costs are included in the graph below:




Conclusion

We take great pride in the work we have done this year on the UW concrete canoe team.  Beyond creating a great canoe, we have also gained invaluable experience that will help us when we become practicing engineers. Now we want to continue this learning process by traveling to Clemson in June. If it were just a matter of keen minds and diligent man-hours, we would already be at Nationals.  But, as with any great endeavor, monetary investment is required. We sincerely appreciate any support that you can offer our team and thank those that have helped us get where we are today. Go Dawgs!


Thank you to our amazing sponsors for donating funds, materials, and services!

Sponsors for the National Competition:


Sponsors Prior to Regional Competition:
Alpha Dawg: $1500 or More
Silver Husky: $1000 - $1499
Bronze Dawg: $500 - $999
Partner: $250 - $499







National Concrete Canoe Competition: A Huge Success! 

  Published on Saturday, Jun. 27, 2015 at 04:04 PM (PST)
After three exciting days of competing at the National Concrete Canoe Competition, we are proud to announce that our canoe, Ska’ana, placed 9th in the overall competition (placing 5th in Design Paper, 6th in Oral Presentation and 10th in Final Product). This is the 4th time in UW’s Concrete Canoe history that we have placed top 10! Thank you for helping us make Nationals a concrete reality!

The competition consisted of 22 teams that cumulatively traveled 50, 000 thousand miles to compete in South Carolina. Each team brought unique ideas, innovations and conversations to the world of concrete canoes and we were excited to meet and learn about each team.  Through the display day, the presentations, races, and fun events, the competition proved to be an incredible experience. The team was stoked to see a year of hard work result in success.

Looking forward, our final goal of the year is to finish our campaign! Thanks to your help we only have 4% yet to go and need your support to finish strong. 
   

More Photos and Videos from the Competition:
Our Photos from the Competition (and competitions of year’s past): https://www.flickr.com/photos/131491575@N06/albums
Photos of All 22 Teams’ Displays: https://www.flickr.com/photos/americansocietyofcivilengineers/sets/72157654436582138/
The Results of the Competition: http://www.asce.org/concrete-canoe-results/
Video of Highlights From the Competition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=au0dTOridug

The Importance of Communication 

  Published on Tuesday, Jun. 9, 2015 at 07:35 PM (PST)
To most people, engineers are the ones who have no social skills. We, apparently cannot communicate or socialize with people because we all speak in a foreign language called “engineering speak.”  To non-engineers we are the geeks, the nerds, and the socially awkward bunch. Our only skills are those of a human calculator.  I’m not going to deny the fact that we are not always a social group of students, but being painfully socially awkward is taking the stereotype a bit far.

Communication is key in our profession. Collaboration is even more vital. Without it, we wouldn't have our bridges, roads, buildings, dams, or anything really. Most importantly, without collaboration and communication we would not have our beautiful Canoe.  It would have been nearly impossible for a single person to build and design Ska’ana.

“Team” is a term that does not only mean a group of people working together. It means spending countless hours building each other up, working together, teaching each other, and learning together.We wouldn’t have made it this far without our “nonexistent” social skills. Networking does not only take place in the business world, engineers utilize it as well. A network is like a web, but it is a web that is almost invisible unless you take the initiative and courage to look for it.

Our whole team is taking the initiative to create an even bigger and better network by going to regionals and making friendships there, as well as, fundraising to get to nationals. Through all this, we develop and practice professional skills.


UW Concrete Canoe Members Speaking with Students from University of Alaska Fairbanks


We've Reached 40% of our Goal! 

  Published on Wednesday, Jun. 3, 2015 at 12:41 AM (PST)
Wow!!!  This response from our sponsors is incredible! 

Our campaign has been active for only TWO DAYS and we have raised 40% of our goal! This is way ahead of the 35% goal we had for the first week!
Keep up the great work team! 

Ann & Robbie






James Harvey

Gave $100.00

Gave $100.00

Gary Rusk

Gave $50.00

Kevin Neher

Gave $100.00

Bob Bechtol

Gave $50.00

patricia mordini

Gave $100.00

Laurence Norton

Gave $50.00

Gave $500.00

Mike Newman

Gave $50.00

Michael Harvey

Gave $100.00

Gave $100.00

Susan Nuzum

Gave $50.00

Heidi Peter

Gave $10.00

John Timothy Altamira

Gave $50.00

Patti Jones

Gave $10.00

Phyllis Levy

Gave $50.00

Robert Marts

Gave $250.00

Linda Shaw

Gave $100.00

Victoria Lahti

Gave $50.00

Nathalie Gelms

Gave $50.00

JoAnn Trujillo

Gave $20.00

Herjaan Tsai

Gave $100.00

Maree Choenden-Dhongdue

Gave $10.00

Tom Cohen

Gave $50.00

Catherine Taei

Gave $50.00

Beth Theiss

Gave $50.00

Selina Heppell

Gave $50.00

Marc Gelms

Gave $500.00

Roger Hazenberg

Gave $100.00

Kyle Karpack

Gave $100.00

Evelyn Karpack

Gave $50.00

Eric Edenholm

Gave $250.00

David Boss

Gave $250.00

Gave $100.00

Kathryn Mobrand

Gave $50.00

Marion Palileo

Gave $200.00

Michael Miller

Gave $50.00

Paul and Lisa Gerding

Gave $50.00

Franklin Tsai

Gave $50.00

Beth Harvey

Gave $100.00

Jack Oldenburg

Gave $100.00

MARGARET ORSI

Gave $100.00

Elizabeth Albright

Gave $500.00

Chin Tang

Gave $25.00

Katherine Lehew

Gave $100.00

Elaine Murakami

Gave $25.00

Barbara Lyons

Gave $100.00

Debbie Antonio

Gave $50.00

Mary Schuhler

Gave $100.00

Jeff Beehler

Gave $250.00

Alex Lamb

Gave $100.00

Ellen Brenden

Gave $25.00

Karen and Larry Karpack

Gave $250.00

Jane Lee

Gave $250.00

Craig Frankel

Gave $100.00

Sean Yeung

Gave $50.00

Gregory Miller

Gave $100.00

Daniel Frankel

Gave $50.00

Peter Mackenzie

Gave $50.00

Seana Davidson

Gave $50.00

Anna Hagen

Gave $10.00

Rose Harvey

Gave $50.00

Eloice Helms

Gave $50.00

Barbara Orsi

Gave $50.00

David Johnson

Gave $50.00

Barbara Azzato

Gave $100.00

adrienne christensen

Gave $25.00

Kathleen Spitzer

Gave $100.00

Kimberly Olson

Gave $250.00

Barbara and Steve Olson

Gave $50.00

James Pankanin

Gave $50.00

Karen Rarich

Gave $25.00

jeffrey frankel

Gave $100.00

Ryan Hughes

Gave $25.00

Kirsten Rarich

Gave $10.00

Xiao Han

Gave $25.00

Heidi Menard

Gave $100.00

John van den Meerendonk

Gave $25.00

Kellie Chiou

Gave $10.00

Andrei Arevalo

Gave $10.00

Rosalie Frankel

Gave $25.00

Lewis and Kathy Orsi

Gave $250.00

Patricia Crisp

Gave $25.00

Megan Gleason

Gave $100.00

Cindy Serafin

Gave $100.00

David Slezak

Gave $25.00

Robin Kavanaugh

Gave $100.00

Patricia Harvey

Gave $50.00

Blythe Meigs

Gave $25.00

Andrew Verber

Gave $100.00

Lisa Neher

Gave $5.00

Jonathan Dahl

Gave $100.00

Jenifer Kennedy

Gave $200.00

Saeed Tari

Gave $100.00

23 supporters have chosen not to be listed for "UW Concrete Canoe : Make Nationals a Concrete Reality ".

Make an Impact

Fan

Give $5

A gift of this amount allows you to show that you support this project!

Fan

Give $5

A gift of this amount allows you to show that you support this project!

Fan

Give $5

A gift of this amount allows you to show that you support this project!

Fan

Give $5

A gift of this amount allows you to show that you support this project!

Whale Sighting

Give $10

Every dollar donated brings us closer to our goal of sending our team to Clemson, SC for the National Championship.

Whale Call

Give $25

Donate funds that will help bring more team members to Nationals so they can collaborate with engineering students from across North America.

Free Swim

Give $50

Contribute funds to cover a portion of the daily rental car fees in South Carolina. Help our team easily move between destinations during the competition.

Ska'ana on the Move

Give $100

Fund the U-Haul truck needed to transport Ska’ana at the competition. We cannot get the boat to the water without a truck!

FEEd a Whale

Give $250

Pay one participant registration fee which also includes room and board. Provide a participant with a meal and a place to rest after a long day of competing.

Whale Migration

Give $500

Cover all transportation costs to send one team member on the entire 5,500 mile round trip so he/she can learn about new design and construction techniques in person.

Whale Rider

Give $750

Completely pay for one team member to attend the competition and compete at the highest level. Choose a team member to send you a personal update from the competition.

A Whale of a Gift

Give $1,000

Cover a third of the cost to drive Ska’ana to Clemson University. Receive a small piece of a canoe from a previous year.